Architect

Architect

Architect

Creative ideas are stimulating and developing. Architects have on many occasions been involved in designing incredible buildings with fire retardant treated wood as a key material; The Mjöstornet tower in Norway is one example.

This tower shows that one does not have to compromise between fire safety and creative design. What does it mean to properly take fire safety into account? There are many articles on this site that describe this in detail, but what it comes down to is ultimately the importance of following current legislation to ensure that all people that reside in these buildings can do so safely.

There is an increasing demand for wood materials in installations that impose requirements on reaction to fire properties, for example B-s1, d0. When demand rises, you as an architect will be faced with many choices when it comes to products and solutions for fire retardant treated wood; it is then important to have complete and accurate documentation as the situation requires. It is important to know the meaning of, for example, an RISE certification, a CE marking in accordance with the harmonized product standard, or a type approval certificate. The checklist below sums up the most important points for you to know as an architect.

 

Checklist for architects

Some points to consider when choosing among products and solutions:

  • Regardless of the product, always request a Declaration of Performance (DoP).
  • The absence of a DoP makes the product illegal to use in construction works.
  • Remember that every type of wood must be certified. For example, spruce cannot replace pine, and vice versa.
  • Visit the manufacturer's website to form an understanding of his or her credibility and knowledge. Check all references.
  • Ask for related documents as well as an Appendix-E for easier performance overview.